Science-Infused Curriculum Reaches over 6,500 Valley Students

Over 6,500 students were served in school sites or at home by the Migrant Education program this summer.
Over 6,500 students were served in school sites or at home by the Migrant Education program this summer.

This summer, the Migrant Education Program oversaw instructional services at 42 Tulare and Kings County school districts – the largest number coordinated by the program in recent years. Over 6,500 migrant education students (pre-K to age 22) were served by highly qualified teachers on school sites and at home.

The focus of summer programs was on science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM). Woven throughout the language arts and mathematics curriculum were science-related studies.

“We were provided dynamic and intensive training by Assistant Superintendent Charlene Stringham and ERS curriculum specialists Michelle French and Jared Marr on integrating STEM into all subject matters,” said Migrant Education Administrator Tony Velásquez.

For students who were unable to attend classes at a school site, migrant staff, under the supervision of certificated personnel, provided instruction at home. The program also provided services to pre-K children and piloted three pre-K bi-literacy classes – one in Kings County and two in Tulare County. Older students had the opportunity to connect with colleges and universities through programs at West Hills College, Lemoore, Fresno State and California State University, Channel Islands.

This summer, science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) curriculum was infused into all areas of Migrant Education instruction, including language arts and mathematics.
This summer, science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) curriculum was infused into all areas of Migrant Education instruction, including language arts and mathematics.

In each of these programs, Migrant Education administrators conduct thorough pre and post-evaluations to monitor the progress the students made over the summer.

“The program has done a great job of transitioning through changes in Migrant Education in recent years while continuing to deliver the high quality, individualized instruction these students need to be successful,” said Tulare County Superintendent of Schools Jim Vidak.

This article is reprinted by permission from The News Gallery, published by the Tulare Office of Education.

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